Is Social Justice Enough? – Johan Mostert – Ep 071

Dr. Johan Mostert started his pastoral care ministry in 1972 with the Apostolic Faith Mission (AFM) in South Africa (the largest Pentecostal denomination in the country) and served churches in Johannesburg, Pretoria and Cape Town. From 1989 to 2000 he served as national Director of the AFM Welfare Department with its several hundred employees, ten homes for the aged, children’s homes and 310 local church voluntary welfare organizations. He is widely recognized as a leading authority on local-church response to the global AIDS pandemic and travels frequently as a speaker and project consultant for faith-based development agencies both in the US and internationally. He is Professor Emeritus of Community Psychology at the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary (AGTS) where he taught for the past 12 years.  His areas of specialization were discipleship and social justice courses. Currently he is Director of Research and Development for AG Family Services Agency where he is heading CompaCare, a national strategy to help local churches be more effective in addressing the foster care crisis.

Dr. Mostert’s unique experiences living through the Apartheid regime has given him a unique perspective when it comes to issues of social justice for marginalized people. He helps us work through issues of racial tension, help for the poor, and what it means for the church to engage culture in the work of social/biblical justice.

 

Resources Mentioned:

When Helping Hurts, by Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert

Generous Justice, By Timothy Keller

Discipleship Dynamics – https://discipleshipdynamics.com

CompaCare – http://www.compactfamilyservices.org

 

Dr. Mostert’s full bio:

Johan Mostert started his career in pastoral ministry in 1972 with the Apostolic Faith Mission (AFM) in South Africa (the largest Pentecostal denomination in the country) and served churches in Johannesburg, Pretoria and Cape Town.  After completing his first graduate degree in 1977 he accepted an appointment to the church’s national Welfare Department to serve as a counselor to 200 abused and abandoned children at the Villa Lubet Children’s Village.  Over the next 23 years his ministry grew as he progressively took over management responsibilities for the AFM’s community social work services, geriatric services and adoption services for the Church.

From 1989 to 2000 he served as national Director of the AFM Welfare Department with its several hundred employees, ten homes for the aged, children’s homes and 310 local church voluntary welfare organizations.  The dawning of democracy in South Africa, and the severity of the AIDS crisis brought new challenges as he led his department into full racial integration and attempted to influence the wider church toward increased sensitivity to the needs of the poor and the vulnerable of their communities.  He was principal author of the NDISWE local church development program and several USAID-funded development projects in Southern Africa.

He is widely recognized as a leading authority on local-church response to the global AIDS pandemic and travels frequently as a speaker and project consultant for faith-based development agencies both in the US and internationally.  His book “How to become HIV+: Guidelines for the local church” was published in 2011 and is aimed at the local church in Africa to assist pastors to develop a strategic plan to address the AIDS crisis in their communities.  He has published books, peer-reviewed articles and chapters in academic books in three disciplines: psychology, theology and missiology. He has five earned degrees in the social sciences and two post-graduate diplomas.  His terminal degree is a D.Phil. in psychology from the University of Pretoria.  Until his emigration from South Africa in 2004 he was a certified Counseling Psychologist, a licensed social worker and an ordained minister.

He is Professor Emeritus of Community Psychology at the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary (AGTS) where he taught for the past 12 years.  His areas of specialization were discipleship and social justice courses and he will remain the track coordinator of the Relief and Development track for the PhD (Intercultural Studies).  From 2012 to 2016 he was the principal researcher in the Kern Family Foundation sponsored research grant on Whole Life Discipleship which produced The Discipleship AssessmentTM.  Currently he is Director of Research and Development for AG Family Services Agency where he is heading CompaCare, a national strategy to help local churches be more effective in addressing the foster care crisis.

Andrea, his high school sweetheart and best friend of 44 years passed away suddenly in August, 2014.  Together they have three married children and nine grandchildren (5 live in South Africa but fortunately 4 are relatively close by in Oklahoma).

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