What C. S. Lewis Knew About Today’s Culture – Ep 067

As Christians today we tend to think everything should be black and white or that our current understanding of the world around us is complete. Are things really as black and white as we make them out to be? Do we really know everything there is to know about the world from the Bible? Or could it be that our current Christian worldview is a reaction to the culture of the world around us? On this week’s episode, Chris and Josh talk through what it means to respond to the culture around us, how our modern-day culture may not be as unique as we think, and how Jesus’ approach is the best for us today. Continue Reading...

When Righteousness Doesn’t Matter

My experience of salvation is this: I thought I was good and deserved Heaven. Then I found out I wasn’t and deserved Hell. My good works and good heritage didn’t matter. I spent a good deal of time living my life under the expectation that I had been given something great because of who I was. I was born into a Christian family. I said the sinner’s prayer at an early age. And I always went to church and participated in all the good activities. I thought my goal in life was to “not screw it up.” I thought my righteousness mattered. Continue Reading...

Learning How to Do Theology from C. S. Lewis

When we experience a world beyond our world we often find a better understanding of our own. Stories do just that; they bring us to a different world. My own hero and spiritual mentor, C. S. Lewis, said it like this when Edmund and Lucy were about to leave Narnia for the last time: “Please, Aslan,” said Lucy. “Before we go, will you tell us when we can come back to Narnia again? Please. And oh, do, do, do make it soon.” “Dearest,” said Aslan very gently, “you and your brother will never come back to Narnia.” “Oh, Aslan!!” said Edmund and Lucy both together in despairing voices. “You are too old, children,” said Aslan, “and you must begin to come close to your own world now.” “It isn’t Narnia, you know,” sobbed Lucy. “It’s you. We shan’t meet you there. And how can we live, never meeting you?” “But you shall meet me, dear one,” said Aslan. “Are you there too, Sir?” said Edmund. “I am,” said Aslan. “But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there.” Good literature (fiction and non-fiction) has a way of taking us beyond our own circumstances and giving us perspective we didn’t have before. Aside from Scripture, no other writer has had more influence on my perspectives than C. S. Lewis. Through the worlds he created, I came to better know my own. Continue Reading...

3 Reasons I Read the Classics

There seems to be a bit of literary snobbery when it comes to Christian classics. A new best seller in Christian self-help or leadership comes out nearly every week. It seems “newest” equals “best” and “oldest” equals “most irrelevant.” We tend to snub the old and welcome the new. Why is this? There may be some great information in the new stuff; I’m not doubting or questioning that. At the same time, I’ve found more life-changing wisdom in the classics than I ever have in the top trending Christian books. Three reasons keep me coming back to the classics instead of just the latest new releases. Continue Reading...

Legalism is Easy

“I wish I could just do my duty and be done today” I thought as I got into the car on my way to church. I could go in, get it done, and go home. It would be much easier that way. There’s a lot to be said for legalism. It makes life simple when you only need to follow a set of dos and don’ts. It’s black and white; this is right and this is wrong. It takes relatively little effort to follow rules. I can control the outcome. The responsibility for my life’s outcome is in my control. Wouldn’t it be nice if the Christian life were this simple and easy? Continue Reading...